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  Last 10 Posts [ In reverse order ]      
DashboardOnFire Posted on 30 January 2019 - 07:29 AM
  Here's the blog post by Rhett Allain - Technical Consultant for the Reboot - about the "MacHacks" used in this episode:
https://rhettallain.com/2019/01/30/macgyver...es-large-blade/
MacGyverGod Posted on 10 October 2018 - 03:25 AM
  Hmm.... this was like the second one I liked less then previous ones. Yet again, we are in more MacGyver-territory just like in Pliers. It's actually weird. The more it becomes MacGyver the less I seem to like it. Talk about having things upside down.

The beginning was just lame. All the effort to get that guy in a helicopter. I would've understood if it was the big guy from Bitter Harvest. If I think about it this guy reminds me of Buddy from Last Stand. He may be big and tough but he's stupid.

The nod it may have given to On A Wing and a Prayer was there but a little subtle. I prefer On A Wing and a Prayer over this one. And I agree with most what was said here. Instead of focusing the episode on the matters at hand, the bromance and banter got in between that. There was too much cutting back to Bozer and Riley but Riley gave some strong emotional perfomances. Strong enough to assume she has feelings for Mac? Bozer felt out of place. Maybe 4 is a crowd but I can dig it if he would just work at the lab, like Willis did.

Nah, this episode didn't do it for. Weakest so far. Interestingly, I didn't like Flame's End to much either. Both 13th episodes are bad, or does it have to do with the number?

When it comes to score... the music sometimes reminds me of John Powell's Mr. and Mrs. Smith especially in the relaxter scenes. Just listen to the track Playing House when Mac and Bozer are talking at home for example. Yet the score doesn't bother me much.

I'll get into Matty in the next episode.
DashboardOnFire Posted on 14 June 2018 - 03:00 PM
  Final ratings via Showbuzz:
DashboardOnFire Posted on 3 May 2017 - 01:57 PM
  There will be a rerun of this episode on Friday, May 26: http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwtv/article...6-2017-20170503
Yrouel Posted on 29 January 2017 - 06:10 PM
  I think this episode had great potential to be pretty good and really channel the best of the classic series however the writing was too sloppy in my opinion. First the bad guy was too lame and just annoying (soo much time to get him in the helicopter...), second the awful line about entropy decreasing (it's the exact opposite in this universe) and third the Leyden jar macgyverism was really really lame or at least very poorly executed.
For the latter I think the writers should have made Mac use the juices of some plant to power the sat phone and it would've been a nice reference to the Ugly Duckling episode in which Mac uses a cactus to power a portable radio.
Miasma Posted on 16 January 2017 - 11:37 AM
 
QUOTE

It's well known that TV viewers don't have the same attention-span anymore.

I know people often say that, but we're living in a time when the most popular shows tend to be the ones with huge story arcs (often spanning multiple seasons), and such shows require quite a bit of commitment (and attention) from fans. Most of the popular shows in the 80s were simpler shows, where everything got neatly resolved in about 45 minutes. So I think people today do have a pretty strong attention span for television, but with so many shows to choose from, they won't invest their time in a show that doesn't offer strong characters and compelling plots. MacGyver is a bit threadbare in terms of plot and character-depth, so I guess it feels the need to rely on quick edits to keep people's attention.

QUOTE

I think they could even reduce the "action" if they did more and longer MacGyverisms instead. The MacGyverisms is what makes the show unusual.

I really have no problem with the number of MacGyverisms in this show. They actually do quite a lot more in this show than the original series did (especially by the later seasons, when there were some episodes that barely included even one.) But they do still need to work on adding tension to the MacGyverisms. I'd actually be okay with them reducing the number of MacGyverisms if they made each one really count.
DashboardOnFire Posted on 15 January 2017 - 02:03 PM
  It's well known that TV viewers don't have the same attention-span anymore. Also, it's hard for a TV-Show to get enough ratings with so many other competition of TV-Shows and Gadgets out there.

The Hashtag #MacGyver is trending every time an episode premieres. I mean that's pretty great, but how can you tweet so much while watching a TV show??? Either you're watching or tweeting. They might have good ratings, but I wonder if people even remember what they've just watched (or listened to while doing something else), especially now that the next episode won't air until February.

I guess modern TV-Shows are so fast-paced that you don't dare to change the channel or do something else in between. Episode 13 is a perfect example of writing/filming/editing in a way that you can't stop watching for even a second, otherwise you're missing important plot. At least this was happening to me when I watched it (because I don't even have the distraction of commercial breaks). But it also robbs the show of a crucial plot-device: The impact of the MacGyverisms. I can't really remember them afterwards even tough I never took my eyes off the story happening on screen.

Also, I think it robbs the actors of showing their acting capabilities. The strongest scenes have been "quiet" scenes (e.g. the talk between Jack and MacGyver while visiting Jack's father's grave in Episode 3 or when Riley confronted Jack leaving her and her mother in Episode 11). They wanted to create a show with team bonding and bromance, so why throwing these scenes into the middle of action scenes? It's like they don't trust their own concept anymore and are afraid to lose viewers if there's not enough action. That might also be the reason why there wasn't a single voice-over in this Episode? I think they could even reduce the "action" if they did more and longer MacGyverisms instead. The MacGyverisms is what makes the show unusual.
Joe SAKic Posted on 15 January 2017 - 01:02 PM
 
QUOTE (DashboardOnFire @ 15 January 2017 - 03:02 PM)
QUOTE (DashboardonFire @ 15 January 2017 - 06:26 PM)
Don't make "Mac and Jack" talk about their feelings, declaring their love for each other and cracking jokes while running through the woods with bad guys chasing them. It's too much. This Episode would have worked perfectly without too much emotional stuff after the crash and without cutting back so much to the Phoenix Offices at all. With the action-movie-like editing, it would have been a helluva action episode. They could have done more touchy-feely-stuff in the next  Episode (e.g. Jack being upset about not getting a promotion, meeting the new boss, talking about the fallout of Sarah getting married and Thornton being arrested).

That's right on!I think they're just trying to 'not' put all their eggs in one basket and draw ratings from as varied a cross-section of the audience that they can ... that way they'll (hopefully) stay afloat for a longer duration. Teachers complain so much nowadays that they can't hold the attention spans of the digital gadget generations. How could you? So goes many of the TV series where they're afraid you'll tune out if they slow it down and try to build some old-tyme suspense.

Edit: I'd like to add an analogous situation. I took a bunch of kids whale watching this summer, an ultimate adventure that RDA would well appreciate. We did see whales at the very end of the 3 hour tour, but the kids had long pulled out their gadgets and were getting quite board. The newer generations don't seem to have the attention spans to ride out the anticipation and build up .... something the first series was very good at creating .... which is like waiting/knowing that even though you don't see the whale for the first 58 minutes, the anticipation of seeing it keeps you riveted. The new MacGyver (seems) to well recognize this trait and thus throws bones to us all btw of social relationships, bromance and/or those machine gun style flurry of clips and so that they don't lose the majority ADHD crowd. Needed in this day and age? Quite possibly! Appreciated? Not by me! doh.gif
Agent MacGyver! Posted on 15 January 2017 - 12:01 PM
  I hope they don't make a joke out of the new boss for Phoenix.

I did like when Pete (and Patricia in this continuity) joined MacGyver on adventures, I don't know if this actress will be physically able to do that.
DashboardOnFire Posted on 15 January 2017 - 11:02 AM
 
QUOTE (Miasma @ 15 January 2017 - 06:26 PM)
It sometimes feels as if the editors of this show think everyone who watches it suffers from Attention Deficit Disorder, and that's why they edit everything so quickly and have that constant techno elevator music in the background.  It's like they're afraid that if they have a quiet scene without a million quick edits, the audience will fall asleep.

That's the status quo of most modern action movies and TV shows and the main reason why I hate most of them.

I just started watching the first Season of "Lie to me" (with Tim Roth) and in Episode 8 I was mentally screaming "What's with the d... shaky cam???" for 40 minutes. It wasn't action scenes, but people talking in offices. There's no need to film these scenes like an action movie. I was getting wiplash just watching them talk and getting distracted from what they were saying. I already need more concentration than usual when I'm watching the original and not the dubbed version, so...

I guess it depends on the style of a show, but also on the style of the director that changes with every episode. I expected fast pacing and hard cuts for the MacGyver Pilot because of James Wan directing (after directing Fast & Furious) and because the storyline was paced as an action show to draw new and young viewers in.

Considering the plot of Episode 13, I wouldn't mind fast-paced-editing per se, but the problem I have is that Lenkov declared several times that the Reboot is a family-oriented show with a team aspect. It's also labelled as "drama" and not as "action". Which is proven time and time again with all the touchy-feely-scenes and all the talking. But these scenes don't work with the loud background noise and shaky-cam-alike and fast-paced editing.

I think that either they should give these scenes the "room" that they deserve (meaning: zooming in on the faces and the emotions, no music or other disctractions) or wait for the right moment and turn up the action. There's a time and place for touchy-feely-stuff and for comedy, and the showmakers continously miss the mark. They throw in all the good stuff at once. But instead getting a good scene out of the ingredients, they get a mess.

Don't make "Mac and Jack" talk about their feelings, declaring their love for each other and cracking jokes while running through the woods with bad guys chasing them. It's too much. This Episode would have worked perfectly without too much emotional stuff after the crash and without cutting back so much to the Phoenix Offices at all. With the action-movie-like editing, it would have been a helluva action episode. They could have done more touchy-feely-stuff in the next Episode (e.g. Jack being upset about not getting a promotion, meeting the new boss, talking about the fallout of Sarah getting married and Thornton being arrested).